Blog - Lansdale, PA Foot Doctor
If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right. Switch to Accessible Site
Lansdale Podiatry Office
231 E. Main Street
Lansdale, PA 19446
(215) 362-2220
Monday, 10 August 2020 00:00

Do you have diabetes? If so, you are not alone. An estimated 422 million people worldwide are afflicted with this condition. But did you know that diabetes can have serious implications for your foot health? Each year in the United States, between two and six million people develop a diabetic foot ulcer. Diabetic foot ulcers are open sores or wounds on the feet which do not heal properly and which can lead to serious complications, including infections and amputations. To make the situation even more dangerous, many diabetics also develop peripheral neuropathy, a condition that causes impaired sensation in the feet. This makes it harder to detect potentially serious cuts, scrapes, sores, and wounds on the feet. If you have diabetes and notice any sores or open wounds on your feet, it is strongly recommended that you visit a podiatrist for treatment.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Rick L. Simon from Lansdale, Pennsylvania. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Lansdale, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Monday, 03 August 2020 00:00

Athlete’s foot, also known as tinea pedis, is a fungal infection of the skin on the feet. The types of fungus that cause athlete’s foot thrive in moist, warm, dark environments and multiply easily on irritated or weakened skin. Symptoms of this infection include itchy, sore, or scaling skin between the toes, and a burning sensation in the affected areas. Your feet may also develop an unpleasant smell. Left untreated, blisters may form on the feet and eventually break open, exposing raw skin and potentially leading to secondary bacterial infections. If you have athlete’s foot, it is recommended that you seek medical treatment, as this infection can also spread to other parts of the body. Consult with a podiatrist if you notice that you have symptoms of athlete’s foot.

Athlete’s foot is an inconvenient condition that can be easily reduced with the proper treatment. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Rick L. Simon from Lansdale, Pennsylvania.  Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be an extremely contagious foot infection. It is commonly contracted in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools, or anywhere your feet often come into contact with other people.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

  • Hydrate your feet by using lotion
  • Exfoliate
  • Buff off nails
  • Use of anti-fungal products
  • Examine your feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts develop

Athlete’s foot can cause many irritating symptoms such as dry and flaking skin, itching, and redness. Some more severe symptoms can include bleeding and cracked skin, intense itching and burning, and even pain when walking. In the worst cases, Athlete’s foot can cause blistering as well. Speak to your podiatrist for a better understanding of the different causes of Athlete’s foot, as well as help in determining which treatment options are best for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Lansdale, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Athlete's Foot
Monday, 27 July 2020 00:00

Warts on the bottom of the feet, known as plantar warts, are a common condition. About 25% of people get plantar warts at some point in their lifetime, often during childhood or adolescence. Plantar warts are caused by the human papillomavirus, also known as HPV, and can be highly contagious. To prevent plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot in damp public areas, such as community swimming pools or water parks. Wear clean cotton socks and change them regularly. Inspect your feet and take extra precautions if you notice a cut or scratch, as these may make you more susceptible to infection. If you or someone close to you has a plantar wart, it is suggested to keep it covered with a bandage in order to avoid spreading the virus to others. To avoid the risk of contagion or infection, it is recommended that you consult with a podiatrist right away.

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact Dr. Rick L. Simon from Lansdale, Pennsylvania. Our doctor will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Lansdale, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What Are Plantar Warts?
Friday, 24 July 2020 00:00

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.